Export Times: HEVC vs Web presets

I just about fell out of my chair. I have a 1 hour-long video to export and always use the WEB-HIGH preset. I thought I would try this new fangled HEVC and WOW! 12 HOURS (NOT A TYPO) was the time for the export! I let it run for about 10min to let it settle down because it started out at 20 hours then seemed to get nestled in at 12 hrs. I switched it to Web-High and changed to use the Hardware Accelerations Apple 264 option and dropped it to 11 MINUTES!!! Has anywho who has done a complete HEVC export noticed the time being that dramatically ling compared to the h264? If it takes that much longer.. is.it.worth.it?!?

 

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  • Only some very recent Macs are designed to support HEVC in hardware. On my 8 core iMac Pro with Vega 64 GPU I did a full Retina screen capture for 1 minute and used HEVC scaling to 1920x1080 and it exported in 13 seconds. Without a Mac that supports HEVC encoding in hardware, software HEVC encoding is extremely slow.

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  • See this article as one example.

    Newer Macs, including the late 2015 27-inch 5K iMac, the 2017 21-inch iMac, and MacBooks and MacBook Pros from 2016 and 2017, will support hardware acceleration for coding and decoding HEVC video. The Kaby Lake chips in the 2017 laptops also support HEVC decoding. Hardware acceleration means faster encoding times in pro apps like Final Cut and Motion, and longer battery life when you're playing back HEVC video.

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  • CraigS  Thank you for that info. I have a pretty beefy 27" iMac BUT it is a late 2013 model... bummer.  

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  • Dan Rollins That would be the cause of the slow encodes. HEVC hardware acceleration is fairly recent.

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  • I have a new i7 Mac mini on the way that supports HEVC... yay!

    But, what happens to the compatibility of the resulting export?

    I’m guessing it would need to be converted again for most uses? Is this just mainly (for now) a better *compressed* version for storage (if you don’t want to save the original)? What do you do with it?

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  • Steve Wilkinson said:
    I’m guessing it would need to be converted again for most uses?

     It depends. Recent computers do better decoding HEVC than older computers. I'm not sure if that's "most uses." 

    Steve Wilkinson said:
    Is this just mainly (for now) a better *compressed* version for storage (if you don’t want to save the original)? What do you do with it?

     It's used like H.264. In the early days of H.264 some computers handled it better than others. Just a new more efficient codec which can be either smaller files or better quality depending on how it's used.

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